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Quantum chaos : an introduction /

by Stöckmann, Hans-Jürgen [aut].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999Description: xi, 368 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.ISBN: 0521592844 (hb); 9780521592840.Subject(s): Quantum chaos | Quantum theoryOnline resources: Publisher description | Table of contents
Contents:
1. Introduction -- 2. Billiard experiments -- 3. Random matrices -- 4. Floquet and tight-binding systems -- 5. Eigenvalue dynamics -- 6. Scattering systems -- 7. Semiclassical quantum mechanics -- 8. Applications of periodic orbit theory.
Summary: "This book introduces the quantum mechanics of classically chaotic systems, or Quantum Chaos for short. The basic concepts of quantum chaos can be grasped easily by any student of physics, but the underlying physical principles tend to be obscured by the mathematical apparatus used to describe it. The author's philosophy, therefore, has been to keep the discussion simple and to illustrate theory, wherever possible, with experimental or numerical examples. The microwave billiard experiments, initiated by the author and his group, play a major role in this respect. The author assumes a basic knowledge of quantum mechanics."--Jacket.
List(s) this item appears in: Complexity and chaos
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530.12 S865 (Browse shelf) Available

Includes bibliographical references (p. 344-364) and index.

1. Introduction --
2. Billiard experiments --
3. Random matrices --
4. Floquet and tight-binding systems --
5. Eigenvalue dynamics --
6. Scattering systems --
7. Semiclassical quantum mechanics --
8. Applications of periodic orbit theory.

"This book introduces the quantum mechanics of classically chaotic systems, or Quantum Chaos for short. The basic concepts of quantum chaos can be grasped easily by any student of physics, but the underlying physical principles tend to be obscured by the mathematical apparatus used to describe it. The author's philosophy, therefore, has been to keep the discussion simple and to illustrate theory, wherever possible, with experimental or numerical examples. The microwave billiard experiments, initiated by the author and his group, play a major role in this respect. The author assumes a basic knowledge of quantum mechanics."--Jacket.